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How To Schedule Your Homeschooling Day And Have Time To Spare

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How To Schedule Your Homeschooling Day, And Have Time To Spare

When creating a homeschooling schedule, areas of instruction, student age, and family schedule should all be taken into consideration. These three things should be integrated to come up with a schedule that will benefit children and adults alike. There is no need, however, to redesign the wheel. Use tools available to you to come up with a schedule that meets your needs.

The first step in creating a homeschooling schedule is to develop a mission statement. Take a few hours to sit down, write and rewrite a statement of purpose for your homeschool. Consider these questions: what do you want your children to learn? What can you provide through homeschooling that your child cannot get through a regular education setting? What traits do you want to promote in your child? Writing a mission statement will guide your instruction and scheduling choices.

Once you have a mission statement, it is time to do some research. Collect information on the topics you plan to teach, and the developmental level of your child. The internet is a valuable tool for this type of research. To make things easier, you may want to refer to the teaching standards laid out by your state for the appropriate grade level. They have done the research for you. Use these standards compared to your mission statement to add and delete topics that you would like to be a part of your curriculum. For example, if religion is something you feel strongly about, you might add that topic of study to your states standards. Or you might incorporate it into already existing standards such as, teaching about people who have made a difference, or use religious works as part of a cultural study or reading material.

With a mission statement and instructional content, you can now begin to schedule your instructional week. With a weekly calendar in front of you, first set down meal, snack and nap times appropriate for your child and/family. Next add in regular necessary family activities, such as weekly trips to the grocery store, sports practice, or church commitments. Keep in mind that these activities can be tied into current studies and become part of the learning environment. Decide how many hours a day you wish to devote to instruction, and what time is reasonable to begin each day. Finally divide the time between subjects. It is generally accepted that at least 2-2 ½ hours a day should be devoted to language arts (reading, writing, grammar, spelling, listening and speaking). Another hour should be spent focusing on math. The rest of your time should be divided among your other areas of study. Some people prefer to hit every subject for a short time every day, but most hit each area of study for a longer period only once a week. For example, Monday – science, Tuesday – social study, Wednesday – religious studies, Thursday – art and music, Friday – community service.

The last key piece in your homeschool schedule is physical activity. While some choose to treat this as any other content area, and designate an hour or two each week to play sports, we highly recommend that you take time each day to address it. Incorporating short spurts of physical activity into breaks throughout the day will reenergize students and allow them to focus more on their studies. Additionally, spending 30 minutes of focused physical activity with your child each day will model and promote healthy behavior that will last a life time.
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BONUS : How To Select The Right Shoes For Your Children

It is pretty usual for children to go around in footies or in socks during their first months. At that age, shoes are merely a 'decoration' item because newborns or young babies never walk so they don't need any kind of support for their body and feet. Nevertheless, the minute kids begin to walk, generally quite a few months before or after they turn one, you must know what types of shoes your kid is going to wear. You may need to buy several pairs of new shoes for toddlers and preschoolers quite regularly, so you will probably begin to ask yourself lots of questions regarding your child's shoes.

Picking the right shoes for your kid is not easy. If you are about to buy shoes, you must ask 3 particular questions before buying. They are the following:

1. How does it fit?
2. How is it made?
3. Is the shoe appropriate for your kid's age?

Let's analyze every single question a bit more thoroughly.

1. How does it fit? - When you ask this, you must take into account the length, width and depth of the shoe and check this carefully once the shoe is fitting your child's foot. If you pick a shoe that is ill fitting, you may harm your child's feet. Your kid can have ingrown toenails, calluses and bunions. Also, try checking your child's 'growth spurts' because when kids grow, their feet grow too. It is advisable to buy new shoes for your child every 3 to 4 months, because it will keep the fit suitable for their feet. Bear in mind that shoes really needn't to be "broken in". When a shoe is not comfortable from the start, it means that is definitely not the right shoe for your kid.

2. How is it made? - Four distinctive parts form every shoe: upper part, insole, outer sole and heel. Children are usually quite active, so it is advisable that the upper part of the shoe is made of a strong but breathable material such as canvas or leather. (Try avoiding shoes that are made of plastic, especially at young ages!). Try picking a shoe which insole is made from an absorbent material. It is not actually necessary to have padded insoles or special arch support insoles at this age. The outer sole has to give flexibility, traction and cushioning to the shoe, but it shouldn't be bulky or sticky when your kid walks. Bulky, sticky outer soles can lead to unnecessary injury by making your child clumsy. Also, heels aren't really necessary at this age at all! Try picking shoes with flat soles; it will make it much easier for your kid to walk.

3. Is the shoe appropriate for your kid's age? - A pre-walking kid doesn't actually need shoes. Their feet just need footies and warm socks; they can even walk barefoot indoors. If you have a toddler and he is just learning to walk, he should wear shoes that have a smooth sole and a high top. Also, it must be made from materials that are light and breathable. These kinds of shoes stay on better and help avoiding falls. If you have a school-age kid, there is a great assortment of suitable shoes, such as tennis shoes, sandals and even hiking boots. If you have an older child, you just have to follow the first two questions and pick the best shoes for your kid.
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